Spoken word recognition in toddlers who use cochlear implants.

TitleSpoken word recognition in toddlers who use cochlear implants.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsGrieco-Calub TM, Saffran JR, Litovsky RY
JournalJ Speech Lang Hear Res
Volume52
Issue6
Pagination1390-400
Date Published2009 Dec
ISSN1558-9102
KeywordsAcoustic Stimulation, Child Language, Child, Preschool, Cochlear Implants, Eye Movement Measurements, Female, Fixation, Ocular, Humans, Male, Neuropsychological Tests, Pattern Recognition, Physiological, Photic Stimulation, Reaction Time, Speech, Speech Perception, Task Performance and Analysis, Time Factors
Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the time course of spoken word recognition in 2-year-old children who use cochlear implants (CIs) in quiet and in the presence of speech competitors.

METHOD: Children who use CIs and age-matched peers with normal acoustic hearing listened to familiar auditory labels, in quiet or in the presence of speech competitors, while their eye movements to target objects were digitally recorded. Word recognition performance was quantified by measuring each child's reaction time (i.e., the latency between the spoken auditory label and the first look at the target object) and accuracy (i.e., the amount of time that children looked at target objects within 367 ms to 2,000 ms after the label onset).

RESULTS: Children with CIs were less accurate and took longer to fixate target objects than did age-matched children without hearing loss. Both groups of children showed reduced performance in the presence of the speech competitors, although many children continued to recognize labels at above-chance levels.

CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the unique auditory experience of young CI users slows the time course of spoken word recognition abilities. In addition, real-world listening environments may slow language processing in young language learners, regardless of their hearing status.

DOI10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0154)
Alternate JournalJ. Speech Lang. Hear. Res.
PubMed ID19951921
PubMed Central IDPMC2873612
Grant ListP30 HD003352 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
F32 DC008452 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States
R01 DC008365 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States
R01 DC008365-01A2 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States
R21DC006642 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HD037466 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
P30HD03352 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01DC008365 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States
R01HD37466 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
F32DC008452 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States